The Red Lama (Red Llama clone)

After making the worst fuzz pedal ever (that’s for another post) and Orange Ya Glad (which was fine, but didn’t add quite as much fuzz as I wanted and adds a weird buzz even when you’re not playing on some speakers), I just wanted a normal fuzz pedal. After doing a bit of reading, I found that the Red Llama overdrive pedal (by Way Huge) is a classic, and after watching a few YouTube demos, it seemed good (to be honest, people are crazy about the “different” sounds of various fuzz/distortion/overdrive that various antique/obscure transistors or configurations will give you, but they all sound pretty similar to me, and I suspect people think they’re hearing differences more often than there actually are).

Anyway, I wanted to tribute the original Red Llama circuit I was cloning, so I went for… read more

Some mathy tesselating stamp art!

I was recently at the art store for some reason, just browsing. I found the linoleum stamp section at the back and immediately wanted to make some! We had made them in 5th grade art class or something, and I remember liking it a lot, but had never since then. They’re kind of the perfect type of art for me, since I seem to like 3D things with more of a “crafts” element. I like carving/whittling anyway, so this was perfect.

I grabbed a few (pretty cheap), and on the way home thought of what I’d do: make a square stamp with weaving paths, asymmetric, such that it could be stamped out in a grid to either create cool repeating patterns, or random ones. read more

Neato sequence art

A while ago I watched this video by Numberphile (a very cool channel!). In terms of the actual math, it’s pretty light, but what I love about it is the idea of creating very cool images via very simple rules.

The idea of it is this. In the video, the guy shows a way of drawing a sequence of numbers (more on that in a minute). You draw a number line, and then you draw a semicircle above the line from the first number of the sequence to the second, with a diameter equal to the distance between the points. Then, you draw a semicircle from the second to third numbers of the sequence in the same way, except this time, the semicircle goes under the number line. You continue this way as long as you want, alternating above/below for the semicircles. read more

Motion detection with the Raspberry Pi, part 2

Hi hi!

In this post, I’m really just going to concentrate on building the whole pipeline. It’s going to be rife with inefficiencies, inaccuracies, and stuff I 100% plan on fixing, but I think it’s good to get a working product, even if it’s very flawed. Someone I once worked for told me that projects in the US gov’t kind of work that way: there was high emphasis on getting a product out the door, even if it was hacky and awful (though hopefully not). I think that makes sense a lot of the time. It’s probably more motivating to see a project that does something to completion, even if it’s crappy, than a project that is partly carefully done, but still very incomplete. A crappy car is cooler than a really nice wheel. Also, it seems like iterative, smaller fixes are relatively easy. read more

Motion detection with the Raspberry Pi, part 1

Okay Declan, let’s try making this post a short and sweet update, not a rambling Homerian epic about simple stuff.

I got a Raspberry Pi (RPi) and an RPi camera because I wanted to learn about them and mess around with them. If I could do image recognition with them, that’d be a good platform to do ML, NN, and if I got enough data, maybe even DS type stuff. Luckily, there’s a ton of resources and code out there already. I drew upon heavily from www.pyimagesearch.com, which is a REALLY useful site, explained very great for beginners. Two articles that I basically copied code from and then butchered were this and this. read more

Kaggle Housing challenge, my take

In this article, I’m doing the Kaggle Housing challenge, which is probably the second most popular after Titanic. This was very much a “keeping track of what I’m doing for learning/my own sake” thing, but by the end I’ve gotten a ranking of 178/5419 on the public leaderboard (LB). That said, this is super long because I tried a million things and it’s kind of a full log of my workflow on this problem.

I’ve really learned a bunch from going through this very carefully. What I did here was to try the few techniques I knew when I started, and then I looked at notebooks/kernels for this challenge on Kaggle. A word on these kernels: even the very most top rated ones vary in quality immensely. Some are excellently explained and you can tell they tried different things to try and get an optimal result. Others are clearly people just trying random stuff they’ve heard of, misapplying relatively basic techniques, and even copying code from other kernels. So I viewed these as loose suggestions and guideposts for techniques. read more

A spooOOOOoooky project!

bloodhead1

This is a fun one.

It’s also a testament to how nifty and easy it is to quickly whip up a project with Arduinos, provided you have enough of a “critical mass”, as I’ve called it before, of other stuff that you might end up needing. read more